When plotting a fantasy draft strategy, risk aversion is always a prominent thought. You look to minimize risk in the early rounds by avoiding injury-prone players. You try to avoid guys who are looking at possible suspensions or continuously find themselves in front of some sort of disciplinary committee. You even take a deep-dive into coaching schemes to avoid players who may not fit into a new offense being implemented. And yet, after all of that, there is still push-back with regard to handcuffing? What gives?

For those of you who may be new to the fantasy game, handcuffing means you own multiple players from the same team who play the same position in an effort to minimize the damage to your roster should there be an untimely injury or possible benching. In most cases, it is a concept reserved for the running back position. Last season, if you drafted Le’Veon Bell, you handcuffed him to James Conner . It didn’t matter if he reported or not because, either way, you owned...