We are all guilty of the following.

Player A is batting .210 after three weeks so we dump him for the guy who is batting .385.

Three weeks later Player B is batting .295 and the waiver-wire add is batting .285. If you hadn’t made a move your team would have been better off. 

This happens to all of us, each season. Oddly, the majority of such moves occur in the month of April. When a guy is hitting .210 to start the year you panic. When that same guy has a strong first half, and then hits .210 in August, you could care less. It’s all about sample size, now isn’t it? That’s the point of this piece, to discuss sample sizes and to try and set some baselines for you. Before I get to that, some general thoughts. Back to the above for a brief moment... 

Understand that players can struggle at any point of the season. When the struggles occur at the start of the season the struggles are magnified. A 3-for-38 to start the year looks awful with that .079 batting average. Allowing...

With the Ray Flowers’ Living MLB Draft Guide you'll be reading the full version of this article within seconds. Click the button below to unlock your Playbook to victory!