It’s been a little while since we checked in on the stolen bases, so now that we’re past the two-month mark in the season, we can see how the data is looking now in comparison to what we saw last time (steals being up on the year) we looked.

Here’s the current player leaderboard as of games played through Sunday, June 4, 2017:

Name Team G PA SB CS SB% BB% K% BABIP OBP wOBA
Billy Hamilton CIN 51 238 28 4 87.5% 6.7% 20.6% 0.318 0.301 0.276
Dee Gordon MIA 54 236 18 2 90.0% 4.7% 14.0% 0.335 0.339 0.305
Trea Turner WAS 45 204 16 3 84.2% 3.4% 20.6% 0.309 0.289 0.302
Jonathan Villar MIL 55 233 14 4 77.8% 9.4% 30.5% 0.291 0.284 0.267
Elvis Andrus TEX 56 240 14 4 77.8% 6.3% 15.8% 0.341 0.350 0.353
Jarrod Dyson SEA 54 197 14 3 82.4% 8.6% 13.7% 0.261 0.327 0.288
Jose Peraza CIN 52 217 14 2 87.5% 2.3% 13.4% 0.290 0.290 0.277
Cameron Maybin LAA 44 188 13 1 92.9% 16.0% 17.6% 0.289 0.367 0.329
Eduardo Nunez SF 53 218 13 2 86.7% 4.1% 9.6% 0.304 0.313 0.305
Paul Goldschmidt ARI 59 254 12 3 80.0% 16.1% 17.7% 0.338 0.429 0.416
Lorenzo Cain KC 53 225 12 0 100.0% 10.7% 16.4% 0.321 0.356 0.325
Jose Altuve HOU 56 243 11 2 84.6% 8.6% 15.2% 0.358 0.391 0.386
Keon Broxton MIL 52 196 10 5 66.7% 7.1% 38.8% 0.385 0.311 0.318
Mike Trout LAA 47 206 10 1 90.9% 17.5% 20.4% 0.361 0.461 0.478
Ender Inciarte ATL 54 254 10 4 71.4% 7.1% 14.2% 0.332 0.348 0.330
Byron Buxton MIN 50 169 9 1 90.0% 9.5% 34.3% 0.300 0.275 0.249
Kevin Kiermaier TB 59 251 9 4 69.2% 9.2% 25.1% 0.322 0.328 0.317
Chris Owings ARI 55 217 9 2 81.8% 5.5% 21.7% 0.358 0.333 0.337
Kevin Pillar TOR 55 244 9 4 69.2% 6.6% 12.7% 0.286 0.326 0.327
Mookie Betts BOS 53 242 9 1 90.0% 10.3% 9.5% 0.261 0.343 0.346

I left in stats that pertain to on-base work as that obviously gives you a strong idea as to just how much opportunity these guys create for themselves. You know the old adage, “You can’t steal first base,” and as annoying as someone sounds when they say it, it still holds true. Of course, you’ve got chuckleheads like Hamilton and Peraza, both of whom the Reds have running like a bunch of jackrabbits out there, where the on-base concerns are slightly lessened, but for Buxton, Dyson and even Villar, there should be some worry as to where they finally end up on the leaderboard. The top 20 cuts off a nine steals right now and while that will steadily increase as time goes on, you have to wonder where these three will end up come year end and just how much further behind the overall leader they will be.

High strikeout rates are also a killer which means players like Broxton, Buxton and Villar have some added concerns. Buxton and Villar at least have a slightly above-average walk rate, but Broxton is going to have trouble seeing opportunities given his plate discipline. Of course, it may never matter as no manager is going to freely give a guy the green light with just a 50-percent success rate. Kevins Pillar and Kiermaier are guilty of that one too.

Keep your eyes on the number of opportunities for Dyson as well as the Mariners are getting Mitch Haniger back soon. Dyson will still see the majority of at-bats from center field, but GM Jerry Dipoto did say that Ben Gamel and Guillermo Herdia would platoon in left field with Heredia occasionally spelling Dyson in center. It doesn’t seem like it would be a major cut into Dyson’s playing time, but with slumps we’ve seen him fall into, it’s worth noting.

Injuries will soon know both Trout and Maybin from the leaderboard, but while Trout is out for another seven weeks, Maybin should be back relatively soon and if he can maintain this 16-percent walk rate, he should be back on it soon enough. He’s only maintained double-digit walk rates during his time spent in the minors, so the likelihood of that seems a bit low. However, if he does find a way, and can stay healthy, perhaps there’s still a smidgen of fantasy value left in my Fantasy Achilles.

Names we could/should see creep up into our top 20 soon include Brett Gardner, Christian Yelich and possibly even Aaron Hicks depending on how long Jacoby Ellsbury is out.

And here’s what the overall team leaderboard looks like around MLB for the same time period:

Team Att SB CS SB%
Reds 71 59 12 83.1%
Brewers 65 47 18 72.3%
Rangers 65 46 19 70.8%
Diamondbacks 62 49 13 79.0%
Angels 57 44 13 77.2%
Mariners 50 36 14 72.0%
Cardinals 48 33 15 68.8%
Nationals 47 34 13 72.3%
Red Sox 47 34 13 72.3%
Pirates 47 25 22 53.2%
Yankees 45 35 10 77.8%
Padres 44 31 13 70.5%
Braves 42 30 12 71.4%
Astros 41 29 12 70.7%
Twins 39 27 12 69.2%
Dodgers 37 29 8 78.4%
Indians 37 26 11 70.3%
Royals 37 29 8 78.4%
Giants 37 28 9 75.7%
Rays 36 26 10 72.2%
Tigers 35 20 15 57.1%
Marlins 33 28 5 84.8%
Phillies 33 20 13 60.6%
White Sox 32 18 14 56.3%
Blue Jays 31 23 8 74.2%
Athletics 30 19 11 63.3%
Rockies 26 13 13 50.0%
Cubs 24 16 8 66.7%
Orioles 18 14 4 77.8%
Mets 18 13 5 72.2%

Always important to just keep tabs on which teams are doing the most running. For those who will soon be in need of some stolen base streaming, head-to-head leaguers, you should probably put together a watch-list of potential pinch-runners and late game defensive replacements who could find their way into some stolen base situations.

Players like Hernan Perez, Delino DeShields Jr., Shin-Soo Choo, Ben Rever, Michael Taylor and…forgive me…Tommy Pham, could prove to be decent streaming assets moving forward. You won’t find a burner among this group really, but they’re definitely better than trying to fish off guys with speed on teams like the Mets, Orioles, Cubs, Rockies or Braves.

And what stolen base piece would be complete with the addition of which catchers just plain suck at throwing out baserunners? Well here you go…

Name Team SB CS PB CS%
Jett Bandy MIL 25 2 4 8.0%
Stephen Vogt OAK 31 6 1 19.4%
Russell Martin TOR 20 4 3 20.0%
Francisco Cervelli PIT 28 6 3 21.4%
Derek Norris TBR 25 6 5 24.0%
Austin Romine NYY 8 2 2 25.0%
Travis d'Arnaud NYM 8 2 0 25.0%
Cameron Rupp PHI 12 3 4 25.0%
Gary Sanchez NYY 11 3 3 27.3%
Brian McCann HOU 17 5 2 29.4%
Tyler Flowers ATL 20 6 4 30.0%
James McCann DET 19 6 4 31.6%
Salvador Perez KCR 25 8 1 32.0%
Kurt Suzuki ATL 11 4 7 36.4%
Caleb Joseph BAL 13 5 1 38.5%

While I can’t map it out for you here, you should definitely be paying attention to which of your players are facing or could be seeing plenty of these 10 backstops who own the worst caught-stealing percentage (CS%) in the majors right now. I’ve been targeting those lesser-known, fringe guys who are in the same division as a few of these catchers and it’s definitely helped me stay competitive in the category, especially in leagues in which I don’t own more than one or two players from the top-20 leaderboard up above.

And one last thing to note:

We are still slightly ahead of last year’s stolen base pace. We’re right about even in the American League with the average team stealing 28 bases and slightly ahead of the pace in the Nationals League which has an average of 30 steals per team. With a 29 steals per team average of for all of MLB, we are again slightly ahead. Last year, those numbers were 28, 29 and 28 (rounding down) respectively.

Keep on runnin’, boys!